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ShirleyHughes

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Reply with quote  #21 
Constantine, I'm hoping that this works.  I'm sending you a big
 
Not to worry!  I'm not flirting.  Just wanted to send something more than a hug.  That "Muah" is planted on your cheek. 
 
Thanks again for all you do.  Now we have to worry about whether the labs are doing this correctly.  Hmmm...wonder if I should get this drawn at Duke instead of here at Lab Corp..

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ShirleyHughes

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Reply with quote  #22 
Why is that wiggly EXTRA exclamation mark doing in my post?  What did I do wrong? 
Shirley
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Reply with quote  #23 
Why Shirley.... you wild woman you!

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LAlalady

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Reply with quote  #24 
What I'm wondering is, since I live in sunny LA (although it's gloomy at the moment), is there an optimal time of day to get sunshine?  I've heard that 15 minutes of unblocked sun is sufficient, but does that hold for late afternoon, just-before-dusk sun?  That's when I'm usually out walking my dog.  I'm fair-skinned but understand that being fair-skinned is actually better when it comes to "natural" D3 absorption.  I'd rather get my D3 from the sun than a supplement, if possible.  If it's only 15 minutes, I'm not worried about burning.  Thanks.

Amy D. 
ShirleyHughes

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Reply with quote  #25 
After the grandkids left this morning (ages 5 and 3), I feel like a WILD WOMAN!  I don't remember using so much energy WHILE in my 20s and 30s when I had my own three little girls!  I believe my 3 year old grandson's favorite world is NO.  Ask him to do something, "no."  TELL him to do something, "no."  Oooohhhh, it's a good thing I wasn't his mommy.  DD's trying to take the word no out of his vocabulary.  And Mimi is becoming a meaner grandmother (that would be me).  If they had not left this morning I probably would have become a wild, raving lunatic! 
 
I love my grandchildren. 
Shirley
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Reply with quote  #26 
Amy, I don't know the answer to this. In fact, I was wondering myself if I should skip my evening dose of D because I got a lot of sun today.
I always got a lot of natural sun and I was still severely deficient... I don't know how this works.

Shirley- ha ha. Be careful... I might change your title under your name to Wildwoman!


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ShirleyHughes

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Reply with quote  #27 
Fancy said she got a fair amount of sun, but her D level was way low also.  I wonder if it's how we absorb it.  I am fair skinned.  However, I don't get my D from the sun.  Also, it's important to remember to take your vitamin D with fat.  As I stated earlier, I often take mine with a few walnuts.
Shirley
 
Gina, I've calmed down.  I'm no longer a Wild Woman.  I may turn into one again in a couple of weeks.  We're going to Charlotte to see our dear little granddaughter graduate from daycare.  Then, she's on to kindergarten.
  Before too long she'll be losing teeth.  I'm getting soooo old!
edge

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Reply with quote  #28 

Shirley:

Unfortunately, there is in fact no reliable way to sustain optimal Vitamin D levels via sunlight exposure, due to wide variability in individual genetics, dermal melanin density, geographical latitude and season, atmospheric particulate filtering, and dozens of other factors. So for example at latitudes of just 40 degrees north (like Boston) or south, there is insufficient UV radiation for any significant vitamin D synthesis for the entire period from November to early March. And new recent findings from Neil Binkley and colleagues at the University of Wisconsin have documented the 25(OH)D status of healthy individuals with habitually high sun exposure in a sun-drenched clime, that of Honolulu, Hawaii at 21 degrees latitude, finding that over half (51%) of this population had clinically low vitamin D status, suggesting extremely wide variable responsiveness to UVB radiation among individuals, allowing some to have low vitamin D status despite confirmably abundant sun exposure under optimal conditions, and these findings have been repeated and confirmed in other climates across the world with high sunlight exposure. And there are racial and ethnic variations in Vitamin D status independent of ample sun exposure, with for example both African-Americans, and less obviously, Asians, consistently tending to sub-optimal concentrations. Given these considerations, and the risk of melanoma, the only safe and reliable way to assure optimal serum 25(OH)D Vitamin D concentrations is through supplementation, preferably fine-tuned via actually 25(OH)D assay.


Constantine Kaniklidis
Breast Cancer Watch
edge@evidencewatch.com

ShirleyHughes

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Reply with quote  #29 
About the Hawaiian population...could that be because of their skin color?

Fancy posted about her exposure to the sun, and how her 25(OH)D was so low.  However, she lives in Michigan which I thought may have something to do with it. 

When you read what many articles say about getting your D from the sun...legs, face and arms exposed for 10 - 15 minutes, no sun block...I have often thought this can not apply to everyone.  Like you stated, there are many variables.

Thanks for clearing this up for many of us.
Shirley   
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Reply with quote  #30 
I had my mom get her vitamin D level checked. She doesn't get any sun and doesn't take any supplements and has not the greatest of diets....
it came back in the high 30s.
How can that be?



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Reply with quote  #31 
(shirley I think you are a secret wild woman.... WW is your new nickname!)

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edge

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Reply with quote  #32 

Shirley, Gina:

As to Gina's query, vitamin D can be stored in the body, especially of high metabolizers. Occasionally, also, fortified dairy product consumption or ingestion of calcium with vitamin D preparations, or more rarely certain disorders such as hyperparathyroidism can abnormally elevate Vitamin D levels, especially in the elderly, but the inter-individual variation in Vitamin D concentrations is so wide that some individuals present high levels with apparently little UV exposure or supplementation, while others are deficient even in sun-drenched climes (and sometimes even with supplementation).

As to Shirley's comments , the skin color in fact was irrelevant - although you could not know this - as there are also a large number of Europeans and other Caucasians in Hawaii and the facts were true across the board, and as I noted these findings have been repeated and confirmed in other climates across the world with high sunlight exposure (about the only distinction of the Caucasian Hawaii population is that it has the highest incidence of skin cancer of anyone in any state of the United States). Melanin pigment is only one of dozens of determinants of Vitamin D levels, and although not widely appreciated, low and moderate levels of UV light exposure stimulate vitamin D production, but prolonged exposure actually destroys vitamin D in the skin (and independently of melanin pigment or skin color, as first shown by Ann Webb and coresearchers with the Vitamin D, Skin, and Bone Research Laboratory at Boston University Medical School, and reaffirmed by colleague their Michael Holick, as well as John Hathcock at the Council for Responsible Nutrition, among many others).


Constantine Kaniklidis
Breast Cancer Watch
edge@evidencewatch.com

ShirleyHughes

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Reply with quote  #33 
I'll tell ya something, Gina, I FEEL like a MAD WW right now.  Had a dentist appointment.  I need an oral surgeon to extract a wisdom tooth.  I need two root canals, and three crowns.  I have EXTREMELY dry mouth.  I want to SHOOT someone!  Between my health insurance being HORRIBLE, and now needing more dental work, I'm NOT a happy camper!
 
Shirley
AKA WW
ShirleyHughes

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Reply with quote  #34 
Constantine, very interesting.  So, does that mean my friend who has a lovely tan and is in the sun quite often (she used to LIVE in the sun) could possibly be not absorbing Vitamine D from the sun? 
 
Also, I take Synthroid.  If my levels are too high could that affect my absorption of D?  I ask because a year ago, according to my blood work, it appeared I was taking too much Synthroid.  I then skipped doses (not a good thing to do I KNOW) because I felt nervous and had more palpitations.  My doctor didn't say anything negative about my thyroid levels.  The next time I had them drawn I was within the normal range.  Also, I had gone back to taking my Synthroid like I'm supposed to (good girl!) for about 4 - 6 weeks before the blood work.  It'll be interesting to see what my levels are when I see him next month.  I've been taking them like I'm supposed to.
 
Thanks again (as always) for explaining all these things that our doctors do not explain because they don't know what the heck's going on anyway.  We have to teach them!
 
Shirley
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Reply with quote  #35 
Oh Shirley- UGH! BAD NEWS ABOUT THE DENTIST!!!

You just asked Constantine something I was wondering too- I am also on Synthroid- I am wondering if that is a factor....

You ask good questions wild woman!



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edge

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Reply with quote  #36 

Shirley / Your Wildness:

Of course not only is it typically the case that the more you tan, the more melanin skin pigment accumulates, hence retarding Vitamin D synthesis, but also the fact of a tan does not ensure a vitamin D level in an optimal range - in fact despite the claims of tanning salons, there is no reliable and consistent association between tanning and efficient Vitamin D synthesis, and it is as probable for someone with a rich tan to be Vitamin D deficient it is someone for someone who is relatively untanned.

As to levothyroxine (Synthroid), it's not implausible that there be some interaction with Vitamin D, probably via calcium metabolism - calcium, especially carbonate, can decrease absorbable levothyroxine levels, and vice versa, and levothyroxine can in some circumstances decrease BMD. In addition, even small out-of-range levels can cause clinical anxiety and cardiac palpitations, and the induced stress in turn may adversely affect Vitamin D metabolism. There is little definitive documentation of this, but the intersecting metabolic pathways of calcium, Vitamin D, and thyroid function suggest the possibility, and there is in fact an evidenced association between at least hypothyroidism and 25(OH)D deficiency.


Constantine Kaniklidis
Breast Cancer Watch
edge@evidencewatch.com

ShirleyHughes

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Reply with quote  #37 
Sir Constantine,
 
How come you are so smart?  I know that's incorrect English, but I ain't so smart. LOL
 
You give us much to think about.  Hmmmm...so, just because someone has a lovely, healthy looking tan doesn't mean they're absorbing their natural D.  I don't have that lovely tan.
 
The Synthroid hasn't helped me to lose weight.    I will take some responsibilty for this.  However, when I started taking Amitriptyline mucho years ago the weight thing started happening.  I'm still on the same drug.  However, I have managed in the past to lose some weight.  One doctor told me I could never lose weight while Amitriptyline.  Haha, I showed him.  I just need to get in the groove to do it again! 
 
Thanks again.
Shirley
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