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Cynt

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I have a question on soy, chickpeas, and other related phytoestrogens. I was told that, altho I could have black cohosh, soy was absolutely off limits for me as a hormone positive breast cancer patient (the Susan Love breast book was one source of this information, my naturopath, another). I only recently read something about chickpeas being just like soy in this regard, and had just bought some hummus; I can let it go to waste, but I thought I'd look this up to see if I could eat it. I was surprised to find several references to chickpeas and soy now being thought to be GOOD for breast cancer survival.

So my question is, what's the scoop? Should we, or shouldn't we, eat soy and other such foods? One study that was referred to found that women with the highest soy diet and no hormone intervention had a higher survival rate than women on tamoxifen who had the lowest soy consumption levels. It said that scientists are beginning to think that the phytoestrogen in soy may be acting like a SERM. I've been avoiding it rigorously, which isn't the easiest thing!

Thanks for the info!

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Bobbi

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Reply with quote  #2 
As a highly ER-positive person, I'd love a basic list of what foods to avoid too, if anyone out there has one.  Chickpeas are in a lot of low glycemic diet books (and I'm trying to eliminate sugar, so I've got a few of those books).
Cynt

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Ok, would really like an answer if anyone has one, for this.

Today I saw several studies, side by side, of soy. The first, done in 1998, found that soy raised circulating estrogen levels. So no soy. But then, two subsequent studies found that breast cancer patients who ate a diet high in soy had lower incidences of recurrences. So that looks like, soy is actually a good thing. I read somewhere where the more recent studies found that perhaps the phytoestrogen in soy was acting much the same as tamoxifen, blocking the estrogen from feeding the cancer. 

So what's the verdict, Edge? Have you read any such studies? And where do chickpeas fall in this? I've read similar things about them.

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edge

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Reply with quote  #4 

Cynt, Bobbi:


Despite widespread - and misinformed belief - soy consumption even at high levels (in the U.S. this rarely exceeds 20 grams/daily, and even that is rare, while in Asia 60 grams/daily is relatively common, and even higher in certain Japanese diets) does not significantly increase estrogen levels.  The latest comprehensive systematic review and meta-analysis of 47 studies by Lee Hopper and colleagues at the University of East Anglia found that in premenopausal women, soy or isoflavone consumption did not affect primary outcomes estradiol, estrone or SHBG concentrations, while in post-menopausal women, there were no statistically significant effects on estradiol, estrone, SHBG, FSH or LH, and although there was a small increase in total estradiol with soy or isoflavones in this population, it was statistically non-significant, and I should note that the fact that neither SHBG nor LH and FSH concentrations were affected argues against a physiologically important estrogenic effect. 


And there is a growing body of evidence that increased lifetime soy exposure lowers breast cancer risk, and that available clinical and epidemiological data fail to support the claim that soy isoflavone exposure increases breast cancer risk (independently confirmed in the studies from Anna Wu and colleagues at UCLA and Mark Messina at Loma Linda and colleagues). [Note: One caution about soy milk: most products are sweetened, and there is wide variability of sugar and fiber and fat  content, and if sugars are high, this can influence glycemic parameters and insulin, which can be adverse on breast  health.  Westsoy Organic Unsweetened Soy Milk is an example of a product that avoids these pitfalls, with 4 grams of fiber, 4.5g of fat, and only 1 g of sugar].

 

As to chickpeas, there is absolutely no compelling robust data suggesting that  they exhibit any clinically significant estrogenic activity (despite widespread unsupported claims on the Internet that they contain "estrogens"). 




Constantine Kaniklidis

Breast Cancer Watch

edge@evidencewatch.com

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Reply with quote  #5 

Edge, You are like a research oracle that we may come freely to - Thank you from my heart for the copious amount of time you devote to educating us, and at the same time bolstering our spirits.  Good medicine!  So now I can expand my diet choices to include soy - the explanations were always so vague....  Mary


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Cynt

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Reply with quote  #6 
Thank you so much!


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Calico

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Reply with quote  #7 
I second every thing that Mary said, dear Constantine......THANK YOU so much!!!


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