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SoCalLisa

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Goddess Forever
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Reply with quote  #21 
Constantine..you are a wonder to all of us!!
I took protonix for almost 18 months while I was first on tamoxifen and then
on arimidex...I also had liver problems at the time that was diagnosed as
acid reflux until they went in and took out my gallbladder (which I am told was
very bad) and they biopsied my liver (that showed bridging fibrosis and probably
non alcoholic cirrhosis)..All that is a given and when they took the gallbladder I
had no need for the protonix and haven't taken any since..my question I guess is
what possible connection could there have been?? The thinking was that the
methothrexate of the CMF therapy and vicocin that I took for bone pain with neupogen was probably the cause...
Of course, I am still dealing with the liver disease...


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nosurrender

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Reply with quote  #22 
i have another drug to add to the ?? list with Femara-
Can you take  Phenyltoloxamine ?

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edge

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Reply with quote  #23 
SoCalLisa, Jeanne:

As to perceived progression on
fulvestrant (Faslodex), the evidence suggests this is exceedingly unlikely - although it can of course sometimes occur - and as I documented extensively in my commentary [see Kaniklidis C. Fulvestrant loading, tumor markers, and ongoing trials. Community Oncology 2007;4:649-650] on the contributions of oncologists William Gradishar and Ronald Scheff fulvestrant (Faslodex) is unfortunately prematurely terminated too earlier, too often: I demonstrated the phenomena of false marker reading and marker surge associated with fulvestrant, and have confirmed along with other investigators hundreds of cases of premature termination of fulvestrant. As I demonstrate there, breast cancer patients display a trend toward increased CA 15-3 and CEA levels during the first 3 months even though they are responding to the fulvestrant therapy, along with a significant increase in CA 15-3 levels at both 3 and 6 months in patient groups that were experiencing stable disease (possibly secondary to tumor degradation). It is now well-confirmed that tumor marker levels may increase during the first few months of treatment in both fulvestrant-responsive and non-responsive patients, so fulvestrant therapy needs to be continued beyond 3 months - assuming the absence of radiologic verification of disease progression - before assessing objective response, since at least one third of patients on fulvestrant are achieving significant clinical benefit despite misleading marker spikes and surges in early treatment phase. You may indeed have experienced progression (rare) on fulvestrant (Faslodex) but if and only if judged by unambiguous radiological verification, after at least 14 weeks of fulvestrant therapy, given that I show that fulvestrant's TTR (time-to-response) is a bit over 3.1 months as found in human clinical trials, rather than judged by systematically misleading and misread tumor biomarkers.

That said, as to metronidazole (Flagyl), several well-conducted pharmacokinetic studies in humans have shown that metronidazole did not increase plasma concentrations of the CYP3A substrates, and hence the evidence based establishes robustly that metronidazole is not a CYP3A4-inhibitor. However, the issues I detailed above concerning PPIs and other agents remain, and it should be noted that both vinorelbine (Navelbine) and bevacizumab (Avastin) exhibited CYP3A4-dependent metabolism, so my advice and guidance stated above stands and may necessitate retreat to an H2RA antisecretory agent like ranitidine (Zantac) or to the least problematic of PPIs rabeprazole (Aciphex).

Finally as to bisphosphonate-induced osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ), you may want to consult my evidence-based patient-oriented service site, ONJ Watch.


Gina:

As to
metaxalone (Skelaxin), unfortunately its metabolism is also CYP3A4-dependent - as is phenyltoloxamine (Novagesic, Dologesic, Flextra, Phenylgesic) which however is a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor, although a moderate CYP2D6 inhibitor. Most muscle relaxants have CYP3A4-dependent metabolism, although two - tizanidine (Zanaflex) and methocarbamol (Robaxin) - are exceptions and could be used as safe alternatives.


Silvergirl
:
My experience is that most drug interaction checking services are casual not comprehensive, and often conclude - wholly illicitly - that if a particular agent is not explicitly mentioned in the
drug interactions section of the product label and/or not noted in the standard Cytochrome P450 Drug Interaction tables, then it is unproblematic; a systematic literature search and studies appraisal needs to be undertaken.


Constantine Kaniklidis
Breast Cancer Watch
edge@evidencewatch.com

Jeann46

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Reply with quote  #24 
Constantine,

Thanks for your thorough review of my questions. Unfortunately, my progression on fulvestrant was based on a palpable growth and identified by radiologic verification and core biopsy. Since my PR status is negative, it's my understanding that that lowers my percentage of responding to anti-estrogen therapy. Tumor markers were not used.

As to the acid stomach, is there any reason to use Zantac over Pepcid AC? Does that class of drug work equally?

Again, thanks for your well-researched input.


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Jeanne
edge

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Reply with quote  #25 

Jeanne:

You are confirming my point: you said that you were "on that [fulvestrant (Faslodex)] for only 6 weeks before progression was noted". All leading endocrine experts are in essential agreement that (1) fulvestrant (Faslodex) is commonly discontinued prematurely, before it has an opportunity to begin to work (2) that, in the wake of the evidence I myself published, a fair trial of it must be of at least 14 weeks duration, and that (3) it is at least as effective as any other endocrine agent, including AI therapy, lacks significant potential for the musculoskeletal adverse events of AIs, and is minimally subject to drug resistance, indeed being used to overcome drug resistance of other agents when it sets in. Regardless of the tumor biomarker issue, your radiological confirmation of progression was, if I read you right, at the 6 week point, no surprise there since the median time to response (TTR) of fulvestrant (Faslodex) is no less than approximately 14 weeks (per my published findings), and as I and dozens of other clinical investigators have noted, it is pointless to judged progression on fulvestrant (Faslodex) before this time, and dangerous as it would mislead a clinician - wholly incorrectly - into believing that fulvestrant (Faslodex) therapy is failing, when in fact that is not so, but rather that fulvestrant (Faslodex) therapy has yet to start to work.

But I won't press the matter further - the over a dozen critical papers alone on this extraordinary agent that have just appeared out of ASCO 2008 only confirm my perspective - but I'll just underline in closing my point made above that of the various H2RA agents, including your pharmacist's recommendation of famotidine (Pepcid and Pepcid AC), ranitidine (Zantac) is the one H2RA agent considered a weak CYP2C19-inhibitor and so may be the relatively safe (and hence safer than Pepcid) in coadministration with other CYP3A4 and CYP2C19-mediated agents like letrozole (Femara), bevacizumab (Avastin) or vinorelbine (Navelbine), but the final decision is yours on this, in consultation with your own health professionals. And note: the issue is NOT which one - Zantac or Pepcid - is more effective on stomach acid, an issue I never addressed - but rather which is safer re potentially adverse interaction with CYP3A4 and CYP2C19-dependent agents like letrozole (Femara), bevacizumab (Avastin) and vinorelbine (Navelbine).


Constantine Kaniklidis
Breast Cancer Watch
edge@evidencewatch.com

ShirleyHughes

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Reply with quote  #26 
Constantine, geez, now I'm really worried.  I've been taking Alprazalom for years.  I take .5 mg twice a day.  Is this a problem with Arimidex?  And if so, would Ativan be better.  And if Ativan would be better does it work as well as Alprazalom?  And, how would I get off Alprazalom?  I have this "anxiety disorder" called the "crazies!" 
 
My other list of prescription drugs are:
1. Lipitor
2. Synthroid
3. Generic Toprol XL (can't spell the generic, and ConsumerLab has something that may be bad about the generic, but I'm not a member yet)
4. Amitriptyline
5. Effexor
 
I don't think I missed any.  Who'da thunk that I'd be on all these DRUGS!
 
Thanks for your input.
Shirley
 
edge

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Reply with quote  #27 

Shirley:

I'll address the issues below, but you may want to check with an attorney to make sure that you are not inadvertently running a pharmacy without a license (but seriously, your compendium although not trivial is not especially atypical in the oncology arena).

Narrow Escape
Although
anastrozole (Arimidex) metabolism is in part CYP1A2, CYP2C8/9, and CYP3A4-mediated, and carries an FDA labeling warning to that effect, the FDA has concluded - in the same warning - that these dependencies exist but only at relatively high concentrations in vitro and therefore that it is unlikely that co-administration of (a 1-mg dose) of Arimidex with other drugs would result in clinically significant drug inhibition in vivo), and my own research confirms this (as per also AstraZenica scientists Scott Grimm and Martin Dyroff's determination who concluded that anastrozole (Arimidex) would not be expected to cause clinically significant interactions with other CYP-metabolized drugs at physiologically relevant concentrations achieved during therapy with anastrozole (Arimidex)); and this is further confirmed by Masha Lam and Robert Ignoffo in their review.

So the weight of the evidence to date does not raise an interaction alert with anastrozole (Arimidex) across any of the hepatic CYP mediating enzymes, a special status it occupies along with another endocrine agent, fulvestrant (Faslodex) which also has no clinically significant p450 enzyme-mediated interactions. Therefore in terms of endocrine therapy - as opposed to chemotherapy or biological therapy - the concerns for adverse interactions surround primarily the three hormonal agents, tamoxifen and the two aromatase inhibitors, letrozole (Femara) and exemestane (Aromasin).

This would entail no problematic interactions between anastrozole (Arimidex) on the one hand and your non-oncological drug regimen.

Into the Fire
However, just when you thought it was safe . . . .
  • Atorvastatin (Lipitor) is a potent CYP3A4 inhibitor
  • Alprazolam (Xanax) is a CYP3A4 substrate
  • Metoprolol (lopressor, Toprol XL) is the classic "model" CYP2D6 substrate
    (used for testing these interaction problems)
  • Amitriptyline is a CYP1A2, CYP2C19, CYP2C9 substrate and CYP2D6 inhibitor

This suggests some potential for adverse interaction between:

  1. The statin atorvastatin (Lipitor) and the hypnotic alprazolam (Xanax):
    here the potential exists for Lipitor to compromise the clearance of alprazolam (Xanax), hence possibly increasing it's toxicity.
  2. The tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline and metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL):
    here the potential exists for amitriptyline to compromise the clearance of metoprolol, possibly increasing its toxicity.
Rescue Aid
As to how to resolve these potentially adverse interactions, in the first case the least disruptive approach would be to leave the Xanax and switching the statin to either simvastatin (Zocor) or pravastatin (Pravachol), two statins without any significant p450-mediated metabolism.

The second case suggests that the least disruptive resolution would be to leave the metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL) and switch the antidepressant. Since you are already on venlafaxine (Effexor), then your options would be either citalopram (Celexa) or escitalopram (Lexapro), both of which have minimal p450 dependencies of any clinically significant consequence; another option might be the new Wyeth venlafaxine analog desvenlafaxine (Pristiq), just approved by the FDA - some patients may be able to escalate the dose of Pristiq further than the narrower therapeutic index of Effexor and this might allow the benefits you are currently receiving from amitriptyline + Effexor from just a dose-tuned Pristiq.


Constantine Kaniklidis
Breast Cancer Watch
edge@evidencewatch.com

ShirleyHughes

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Reply with quote  #28 
Daggone it.  I just lost my post.  Hit a button...disappeared. 
 
You deliver us such good news.  NOT!  But, I luv ya anyway, and what in the world would we do without you!?
 
Okay, so you're telling me I can continue my 1 mg of Xanax a day.  But I need to ditch my 10 mg Lipitor and change to one of the two statins you suggested.  Lipitor has been kind to me.  I wonder if the other one/s would work as well.  Worth a try. 
 
So, I can keep the Toprol, and ditch the 50 mg Amitriptyline that I take for sleep and have been for over 20 years.  My biggest side effect form that was WEIGHT GAIN!  So, how would I help the sleep issues by coming off Amitriptyline?  I was given this for fibromyalsia years ago (don't think I have fibro..in fact I'm next to positive I don't), but it did help with sleep. 
 
I'm only on 37.5 mg of Effexor.  Are you telling me I need to get off the Effexor, or that one of the other drugs you mentioned may be of more help?  Or, to add one of the other drugs with Effexor.  Of course I'm on such a low dose that I'm sure it's not helping in any major way as for as the "crazies." 
 
I'm such a dummy (as you already know).
 
I went to my primary doc a couple of days ago.  His assistant came in first.  She named off the drugs I'm on to make sure I'm still on them.  It was, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes.  She said, that's enough.  Yep.  Who'da thunk I'd be on all these "drugs."  

The drug police haven't caught up with me yet.  If they do, then I'll consult my attorney.  Oops, I don't have an attorney.  However, my daughter is an attorney.  But she's an attorney practicing Employment Law.  She'd just have to study up on my case.  And she would represent me pro bono!   

One more big problem.....our new INSURANCE that I detest!  I have reached my deductible of $2200 this year by purchasing drugs at full price e.g. Arimidex for $743!  Not to name the other hundreds of dollars we spent on drugs before getting any benefit, plus LE therapist and only ONE onc visit.   
 
I shall go over this "good" news with my onc or my primary doc.  I'm sure Merck will not be happy when I order a new drugS since I just put in my order for the other ones...HAHAHAHAHA!
 
You are literally a lifesaver.  Thank you SO much for all your help.  And I also have to give up my cruciferous veggies too.  What a shame.  Oh well, that's life, and life IS good! 
 
Thanks again for your tremendous help.
Shirley
 
edge

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Reply with quote  #29 

Shirley:

Correct re Xanax, and both simvastatin (Zocor) and pravastatin (Pravachol) should provide non-inferior efficacy; and although rosuvastatin (Crestor) would be another option, also devoid of problematic cytochrome P450 hepatic enzyme interactions, and would likely to be more effective still, I do not like some of the safety signals being raised, and my sense as I note in my Drug Interactions in Oncology is that pravastatin (Pravachol) may be the best and safest choice.

As to the amitriptyline, either adding the excellent lorazepam (Ativan) to your nighttime regimen or increasing the dosing of venlafaxine (Effexor) may be sufficient to pick up the slack.

Life without strife? Devoid of exquisitely complex choices?
Not for us warriors.

Good luck.


Constantine Kaniklidis
Breast Cancer Watch
edge@evidencewatch.com

Fancy

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Angel
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Reply with quote  #30 
Shirley, this money-for-scripts thing is a game being played with our minds. See if you can 1) order drugs for multiple months (my ins co lets me order 90 days or 100 tabs for one deductible); have your doctor write you script for generic stuff, which is USUALLY a lot cheaper; 3) order drugs mail order. And check out different pharmacies. Wal-Mart, for example, is cheaper than most.---I happen to like CVS. You have to play the game. If you're over 65, it's a whole new ball game. But it IS winnable!

I will be on Medicare starting October 1. I can't wait. I will save SOOO much money.


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ShirleyHughes

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Reply with quote  #31 
Hey, Fancy.  How are you doing.  I haven't been here too much lately.  Hope all is going well.

My insurance changed this year.  It's a whole different ballgame.  We MUST reach our deductible of $2,200 before our insurance will pay for ANYTHING, including drugs.  We HAVE TO order via mail..Merck.  We can only use a pharamcy for long term drugs twice each.  We do get 90 day supplies ONLY from mail ins.  We do receive one free primary doc visit a year, one gyn visit (for me, not dh..lol), free mammo once a year and bone density every two years.  I believe those are "well patient" checkups. 

This insurance has absolutey been a disaster.  DH goes on Medicare next year (geeze we're getting old!).  However, if I read the insurance stuff correctly we STILL have to reach a $2200 deductible before it kicks in AFTER Medicare pays their 80%. 

This is a group policy through AT&T.  They bought out Bell South and we were SCREWED!  We had marvelous insurance prior to this one.  I never paid for chemo, mastectomy, Neulasta, the hospital, etc.  I had to reach a $200 and pay my $15 copay for my oncology appointment.  I never had to worry about who's in or not who's in network.  Now all I do IS worry!  And my primary HATES United Health Care.

We're stuck with this.  I am suppose to be happy just having insurance.  But it's about to kill us. 

We reached our deductible so early because I had to see a LE therapist.  She stil hasn't billed me.  I better call her again.  I told her she better bill me before I ran out of money.  I know she's not "forgiving" my debt.  LOL

Thanks for your input. 
Shirley
Indigoblue

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Queen Blue Sky & Golden Light
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Reply with quote  #32 
 
Dear Shirley,
 
Howdy Dootie!  I guess you're not the only one who's thinking, ooooooops!  Why didn't I know this a year or two ago?  Ten, twenty, thirty?   And Constantine is right; he IS the research, the resource, the studies, the back-up, all of it is more reliable than, well are apples reliable?  I know Constantine is definately trustworthy and brilliant.  He may be the only source I am willing to trust, as it stands today.
 
(If you are reading this, Edge, ,  you are a Star, and I am an adoring "Fan Club" member!)
 
Please accept my apology, I was touched by your words, and feel a bit emotional.  Like you, I thought I was healthy, eating a healthful diet, doing right by my family, keeping my body, mind, nose, and life as clean as a whistle.  Well, I guess not.  I feel like going out and robbing a carrot farm, have a party, invite Bugs Bunny and Peter Rabbit.  Really have a wild time.  Jump in a hole, have some stuffed cabbages!  What are we supposed to eat, anyway?  Beans?
 
I have written too much, already, about the seedy world of medicine, food, drugs, pesticides, and genetics; and I am pretty stupid, especially when I'm trying to comprehend the visions and mind-bending research precision and expertise.  Thank goodness we have people to simplify the information these brainiacs think is simplified.  I've attempted to read the anals of Oncology, and anal...oh my.
 
Well, after reading and investigating all of the medications, foods, treatments, misdiagnosis of a zillion illnesses; and dispelling all myths, clarifying the facts, and adding up the how, why, when, where, what, who, wows and owwwwch % $$$$$!!  (not-withstanding, the pain & suffering),
I think I should thank the Angels I've lived this long.  A miracle...whip.  Ate that too.   Loved everything, ate everything, took some real chances when eating broccoli?
Cauliflower?  Kale?  Carrots?  I was prescribed Valium for Menier's Disease (pockets of stuff, causing inflammation and ringing in the ears).  Diuretics and Potassium were also prescribed, and I was also seeing an Allergist, who had prescribed Prednizone, and I was allergic to it, blew-up like a bloated Wild Salmon, turned bright streaky red, and couldn't breath.  He did tests, allergies to birds, chicken, feathers, grass, a long list of drugs, anti-depressants, chemicals, pollen, trees, fungus...smelly socks and dirty underwear!  Sorry...
 
But the drugs, the prescriptions, given to me after trying to figure out what was wrong, for years...the specialists; absurd.  They all had me on ten different drugs, and Dr. Odie Clown, the family joke physician at the time, was handing me samples left and right.  I had suffered three miscarriages, and coughed, choked, ached everywhere, had migraines, nausea, and was sick.  Told I had Fibromyalgia, Acid Reflux disease, IBS, Allergies, Chronic Bronchitas, Depression, Osteoarthrits, and there was a drug for all "seasons, sneezin's, reasons, deseasin's"...
 
My DH was cooking in his Grease Vat, which fell off the stove and burned the house down.  Please, do not pity me, because, WE MOVED.   And guess what.  Every single symptom disappeared within 3 months.  Gone.  I wondered why I felt better when I went away, and wondered...am I allergic to the DH?  I was right about that one, but really,
I think there was mold, fungus, dust mites, and something toxic in the house, or property.  I don't know, I was never diagnosed.  There was never an absolute diagnosis, there was never an actual specific disease to cause so many symptoms.  I have mentioned only a few, believe it or not. 
 
It may have been pesticides, it was a farming community.  I had moved from Illinois where I was attending college, and we were surrounded by cornfields; swimming in the black river waters; black from the soil run-off of the surrounding farms; pesticides...It may have been the oil furnace used to heat our home that my DH and I lived in for 12? years...I forgot.  He lived there long before I married him, and he was never sick.
 
I was not sick before I actually moved there and lived there...and so, too, grew a garden, a beautiful garden, it had been a Fruit Farm with Apple Trees, Peach, Plum, Cherries, Rasberry, Pears...and while I lived there, most of those trees died.  There was/is a high incidence of cancer in this small community; and for an area this unpopulated (when I moved here), it had few doctors, but it had a Cancer Hospital...strange...no Micky-D's, no Department Stores, but it had a sizeable Hospital, a Cancer Center, and the doctors who practiced there, lived elsewhere and commuted.  I've always been suspicious, but, when one gets an Oddball form of Cancer, one begins to wonder...how, when, why.....
 
So, sweet, lovely, adorable, and brilliant, Gifted and Talented Mind !!!, SHIRLEY !!!  You have done nothing wrong!  You have done everything right.  We were good patients, we followed the doctors (plural) orders.  We took their advice, expecting them to be as all-knowing.  Some, parasites, some, caring.  Many of us come from the days when you believed in Church, Government, the Doctor, and ofcourse, Mom. 
 
Now, we can find things out, we can learn from others, read consumer reports, the bad guys are exposed; too bad the malpractice insurance is so high...I think it's scarey to be a doctor these days.  Really scarey to be in the medical profession, when you look at the research, the discoveries, and with all of that, the new diseases.  When my aunt was diagnosed with breast cancer in the early 60's, she was young, very young.  And there was only one kind of breast cancer.  Breast Cancer.  I wasn't that long ago, when you think about it, compared to, per say, Dr. Dina-Sours, who practiced medicine in the Dark Ages, 1959, 60...lol.
 
 
I did want to mention the anti-depressants, most, are cummulative, as are steroids, etc.  And, be careful with getting off of the Lipitor.  I had elevated cholesterol and was given a script for Crestor; I read the inserts...and researched.  It's another one, like asprin, best to gradually remove it under a doctor's supervision.  These drugs...affect everyone differently; we know that, you know that; like chemo, surgery, radiation, it's crapshoot.  Nobody knows...like Clairol...only her Hairdresser knows for sure... and she never existed, just another advertising gimmick, similar to ad campaigns pushing the latest "hot longevity geritolesque drugs"...lol.
 
love you Shirley, and don't, please, put yourself down.  You are the best, and you are blessed.  The Angels are guarding and guiding your path.
 
love,
 
Indi

ShirleyHughes

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Reply with quote  #33 
Aw, Indi, while reading your post my eyes filled with tears.  Why?  Hell, I don't know.  I just get that way sometimes.  Could it be that my gypsy children (dd and her hubby) have left again to travel out West and Midwest.  They'll be back in about three months.  They're trying to decide where to live.  At least it won't be as far as Africa!  They were gone for over two years, and the thought of them BACK on the road has put me in a funk. LOL  But they're living their lives to the FULLEST and enjoying every minute of it.  I should be happy!  And I am.
 
Okay, I got off the subject.  Pills and more pills.  I've considered going off Lipitor and try watching my diet extra specially hard.  Kinda hard to do when dh's likes to eat steak..LOL..but he's not forcing it down my throat.  My problem comes from laziness..not wanting to have to figure out two meals.
 
About the Lipitor.  You said to come off these statins slowly..is that what you said? LOL  I would also like to give up the Effexor.  I'm taking such a low dose that I don't think it's helping as far as my mood goes.  But I can't imagine myself without my 1 mg of Xanax each day.  It keeps my "craziness" in check.  And when Constantine (our angel) suggested possibly using Ativan at night instead of Amitriptyline I don't know if my doc will prescribe Xanax and Amitrip.  I suppose I could talk to my onc.  Or I could try Ativan and see if it works as well as Xanax for the "crazies."  I'm tired of taking pills.
 
I haven't mentioned this on any boards because I'm trying to stick my head in the sand.  Here goes...Several years ago I had an x-ray done for lower back pain (before breast cancer ever entered my body).  It showed I had degenerative disc disease (old age).  Now it's really hurting when I first get up in the mornings.  Been doing this since about July 1.  When I take enough Aleve it subsides.  And, I've noticed my left side hurting a bit..like in the ovary area.  So, of course, being a bc survivor I'm wondering it its SOMETHING ELSE...mets.  I don't know which doc to call...onc or primary...IF I call anyone (still sticking head in sand).  So, is the back problem just getting worse, or is it "you-know-what?"  Hate to say that obscene word!
 
I hope some of your problems have gone away.  Seems like, from what I understood from your post, that after moving out of the poisoned fill house it did.  And, if so, HALLELUJAH!
 
Thank you, Indi, for your sweet, sweet response to my post.  Perhaps I can put the kleenex away for a few and decide what my next move will be. 
 
BTW, have you written a book yet?  If not, get started girl cuz you'll make some $$$$$$$$$$$!
Shirley
Harley

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Reply with quote  #34 
 
 
Shirley,

I am following you around, and I just want to let you know that I'm thinking about you, and if you remember, when I saw you last week, and we went shopping and had lunch together, after my onc appt., and I told you about my worries that this 'thick endometrial lining' was cancer, and you said that you have a 'sense' about these things.  Well, I do too, and I think your back pain is just from your degenerative disc problem, and I have decided that it is nothing to worry about.  Just the same, I am thinking of you, and praying that it is nothing...

I really enjoyed our shopping trip, and I love my new clothes!  My dh loves them too!  Oh BTW, I went by the dress shop and bought that dress I told you about!  Now I need a pair of shoes to match it! 

HUGS
Harley

ShirleyHughes

Wild Woman
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Posts: 176
Reply with quote  #35 
Hey, there, sweet Harley!
 
I too loved our shopping "spree" and lunch we had together.  I'm going to send that little backless short set to my granddaughter via mail.  However, I must find something for grandson first. 
 
I too LOVED the clothes you picked out.  And, boy, didn't we get a bargain!  Too bad we didn't have more money to spend.  All that stuff you bought at Belks...you got ALL three pieces for the price of your pants.  AMAZING!  Shows you how they mark up clothes.  And, I'm glad you decided to buy the dress you talked about.  Sounds really pretty for a cruise.
 
My back didn't hurt nearly as much this morning after "rising" from bed.  I haven't taken any "pain relief" meds today...Aleve.  So far, so good.  It probably is that stupid degenerative disc.  I took Celebrex years ago for it, but it really didn't do much good.  I think OTC stuff works just as well.
 
So, what does that mean.  I'm doing nothing about it for now.  I usually don't obsess over these things, but this was a little different.  So, for now my head's out of the sand and I'm not worrying about it.
 
No, you're not following me around.  I need to call you.  I was going to yesterday, but I remembered that you work.  Then, I forgot about you today. LOL
 
Talk to you later.
Shirley
P.S.  If nothing else good comes out of this bc experience (and I haven't found much that has), at least we are blessed to have met each other.  And, perhaps one day we'll meet more bc sisters IN PERSON!
Harley

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Posts: 145
Reply with quote  #36 
 
 
Shirley,
 
AWWW... you are so sweet!  Yes, I loved that little backless outfit you bought for your granddaughter!  It is SO cute!  I just know she'll love it!  I am sure you'll find something for your grandson, that he'll love just as much!
 
About work, I am not working, til I get in to see that gyn onc, because if I have to have surgery right away, I won't be able to work for awhile, so I told my boss about it when I picked up that dress, and she said that she wouldn't schedule me to work til after that appt., on July 22.  So, I'll be in your neck of the woods again on Tuesday.  My appt. isn't til 2:00!!  After my surgery, I will have to really think about working there.  I am thinking IF I go back, I'll probably work upstairs, because I wouldn't have to deal with some of those women that work downstairs, and they have housewares upstairs.  I would work mostly by myself. 
 
I am SO glad to hear that you are feeling better!  I think alot of the pains we are having are probably from the Arimidex you are taking and the Tamoxifen I was taking.  At least I am getting a break from that, if even just for a couple of weeks.  I am STILL having hot flashes at night, though.  I wonder how long that lasts?
 
I am SO glad that I have met you!  You are special!!  I love to talk to you!
 
Hugs,
Harley
 
 
ShirleyHughes

Wild Woman
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Posts: 176
Reply with quote  #37 
Awwww, Harley, now we're getting mushy!    You're making my head grow.
 
Heck, I don't blame you if you don't GO BACK to work ANYWHERE!  You got some new clothes.  What else do you need.  LOL
 
I know a job you can do at home and wouldn't have to leave your house.  OPEN A DAYCARE!   NOT! 
 
Is your dh going with you to the gyn onc?  I'll have to get my lazy behind off here and call you.
Shirley
nosurrender

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Posts: 7,476
Reply with quote  #38 
Hi Melissa, I posted to you above.
In the Hormonal Forum we have a list of drug interactions.
I checked and it is ok to take these two drugs together.
Here is the link:

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