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nosurrender

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Reply with quote  #1 
Dear Nicki,
Is it syncope? Is that what they call it?

I have balance and dizziness issues from the menieres. But I also have very low BP and I have found lately that I will be standing online at a store or talking to a neighbor and I feel like I am going to pass out.

Are there tricks to do to help prevent this?

I once heard you shouldn't lock your knees when standing, but I have no idea how that works.

Can you help me?

Thanks.
g


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lizws

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Reply with quote  #2 
Gina - I don't have much help but make sure your blood sugar stays level.  I have low bp also but have found if my bs drops fast, I faint. 

Actually I was just bumping this so Nicki could see it. 



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Reply with quote  #3 
Dr google and I discussed menieres also and it mentioned sugar dropping. 

Amy
nosurrender

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Reply with quote  #4 
Thanks Liz and Amy!!!

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chemoabi

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My goodness, I have been neglecting my duties.  Sorry Gina - this week has bee crazy and barely have a chance to read everything.

I think you have a combination of problems, but the classic treatment for dizziness is to sit or lay down.  Usually its caused by lack of blood flow to the brain.  If you can lay down - elevate your legs - that will help with dizziness from low blood pressure.   Someone mentioned low blood sugar - thats makes alot of sense also - so I would carry something with me.  Although something sweet is an immediate cure, in the end it will cause the blood sugar to bottom out.  So its better to have something with some sugar and protein.  Those crackers you can buy - small packages filled with peanut butter are great!
 
Also remember, sudden movements can cause syncope.  There is a phenomenon called orthostatic hypotension.  Blood pressure drops with sudden movement.  For example getting up outta bed to fast.  While your shopping try not to be bending over to get the item on the lowest counter.
 
Anyways, I checked out lots of websites.  I liked this one.  Hope it helps.
 
  http://www.answers.com/topic/dizziness?cat=health
 
Nicki
 
I checked out many web sites and thought this one was the most interesting.

 




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bac10

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Reply with quote  #6 
I'm glad I saw this. 

I've blacked out twice in the last couple of days and have been fighting it all morning.  The oncologist says it has nothing to do with the chemo .  Then why did this start after my first chemo treatment.  I am a diabetic and check my BS frequently.  I checked it this morning at the first feeling of fuzziness and it was normal so I know it's not BS.  I'll be sure to keep a check on my BP, too. 

Sunday morning I found that the cool, tile kitchen floor made a quite comfy place to lay until I could focus again.  Unfortunately the first thing I saw was the terror on my husband's face.   He's handling things a little better now. 

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Hello Bac.  Im glad you liked the website, it pretty well covered alot of different causes of dizziness.
 
It always rubs me wrong when an onc says "well thats not from the chemo."  First of all - who determines what side effects occur.  Well us of course as we are the one going through chemo.  Make sure your not anemic as that could be one of the causes of dizziness.  The website also said stress can play a big role.
 
I learned after a while, that if I had a medical problem - the heck with my onc - I went to my PCP.  You want to find the underlying cause of the dizziness so you can take care of it.
 
Nicki

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bac10

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Reply with quote  #8 
Nicki,

Thanks.  I have been anemic for about 9 months now, under a doctor's care for it and am taking NuIron every day.  I'll make sure they check it when I see the oncologist again Monday. 

I love and trust my family doctor.  He's known me for a long time and knows my history so if some of my problems continue I will be calling him.  I also have a bumpy, itchy rash all over my chest that the oncologist says is not related to the chemo.  Right now...can't I just blame everything on chemo???

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Reply with quote  #9 

sure.....blame chemo! it sucks!

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Reply with quote  #10 
I can't believe this! I've been complaining for over a year, maybe two, about the chemo dizzy fainting spells...

Started taking one-a-day vitamins and they helped tremendously.  Found out I am extremely aenemic and have been forifying my diet with protein, beans, spinach, dark leafy greens and healthy foods.  The dizzy fainting has improved, not completely, but much better.

Indi
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Reply with quote  #11 

The oncologist told me last week that he had never had a patient faint from chemo.  Well then...I'm the first!   I've never been a fainter but when you get so sick and weak it's always a possiblility.


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Reply with quote  #12 
Bac10,
Forgot to mention I also had a horrid, itchy, red, bumpy rash all over and under my chest during Taxol treatments, before Radiation treatments. The doctors acted as though they had never seen a "rash" and didn't know what in the world it could be (like they don't look at skin every day...).  Chemo onc, Rad onc, and Surgeon all pretended "not" to know.  How could they not? Or at least direct me and others to someone who does know...

I went to my family doctor and she tested it for Candidas, Yeast.  That's what it was, the same yeast that causes trench mouth, baby's diaper rash, vaginal yeast, athlete's foot, etc.  I was given 5 days of Diflucan and Nystop baby rash powder (sooothing) and the rash was gone in less than a week!

The cancer nurse I spoke with told me this is quite common, especially after some chemotherapies.  As I sat in the Radiation Oncoloy Waiting Room I must have met at least 10 women suffering from the same thing, and walked out frustrated from being told, "duh, don't know what it could be".

I told them all about my experiennce, and after that the oncologist changed his tune...maybe it could be yeast..? Needless to say, I don't think my "big mouth" was appreciated by the doctors and nurses in Radiation Dept, and they're probably back to telling patients: "duh, I dunno..."

Indi

Gina,
I was also dx with Meniere's years ago for "ringing and water" in my ears, along with dizzy spells.  Never really knew what it actually was as the definition seems to be somewhat generic.  The Ear Nose Throat Guy gave me diuretics and Potassium pills, which I never took after reading about the dangerous side effects.   Think I'll check out Wickopedia and see what it says about Meniere's.  It's my new fave on quickie research site...lol

Have a great weekend!
  {my idea of a great weekend}
bac10

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Reply with quote  #13 

I'm not even going to talk to the oncologist about any more side effects.  I'll just call my family doc.  Thanks for the info about the rash.  It's still there...not any better but not any worse.  I also have a very tender mouth.  My tongue was waxy white last week, is clear now but tender.  He said it wasn't thrush but I'm not so sure.   I don't trust much of what he has to say about all of this now so I'll just listen to my own body and do what I know to do. 


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Reply with quote  #14 
Thrush is also a "yeast" infection; I had that, as well.  It also disappeared after taking the Diflucan.  You may want to ask you family doc to check your skin, mouth saliva, etc. for yeast.  In normal body functions, we all have yeast, but when it gets out of control, it can go all over the place.  I had some throat, stomach, urinary tract and bowel problems; all went away after taking the Diflucan.  The physicians acted as though I were making it up, but thank goodness for my family doc.  Love her, too bad she's not an onc.

Hope this info helps.

Indi
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Reply with quote  #15 
Indi, Menieres is an imbalance of the endolymph fluid in the inner ear. Pressure builds up and the tiny sac that contains it breaks open, flooding the inner ear with that fluid. This causes vertigo.
As the pressure builds you get tinitis, a full feeling in the ear and head, a fogginess and a bit of an unstable gate.
It is an autoimmune disorder that can lay dormant for years. OR drugs like CYTOXAN can make it hit you full force.

The classic treatment is a low sodium diet- under 1500 mgs a day
A vasodialtor like Diamox which helps to reduce the pressure on the blood vessels surrounding the inner ear
Tranquilizers
Anti vert
And a CAM preparation called VERTIGOHEEL.

Drinking LOTS of water helps. Avoiding artificial ingredients like MSG helps.
Paying attention to triggers, sudden head movement, intricate work that requires close eye focusing can bring on nystagmus which is the rapid movement of the eyes that occurs during a vertigo attack.

When you get vertigo it is important NOT to close your eyes. That makes it worse. Instead, focus on a fixed object like a doorknob and really make sure your eyes are focusing. This makes the nystagmus stop and as a result the vertigo stops.

Menieres is a life long thing. Some people go into short term periods of no attacks and some are completely debilitated by it.

I hate it.

It was a gift from my last chemo.


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Indigoblue

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Reply with quote  #16 
Gina, Gina, Gina!!!

Why didn't one doctor tell me about Meneire's in detail.  This is the first explanation I have ever had which makes sense.  I've had this problem since Junior High School; always thought it was because I was a swimmer, diver, and athletic; one doctor told me it would never go away and to learn to live with it; I did. 

Chemo brought it on in a roaring throbbing, visual, dizzy, fainting extreme; thought it was a heart problem, had tests, not the heart...allergy symptoms have also increased, and it affected speech, sight and walking.  I am making a copy of your information, hope you don't mind.  It explains so many of the complications and falling, dizzy episodes.

It was confirmed that I have Meniere's, as did my father by an Ear Nose and Throat Specialist, 4 different doctors, actually.  Not one ever explained to myself or my father what it was, exactly. 

Thank you so much, a billion trillion hugs.
How can I thank you?  No words...blub, blub, tears of joy to know what I am going through is actually "real", and not "swimmer's ear".

Good grief, thank you so much.
My brother also suffers from this.  Ladders terrify us, but we still use them when necessity calls.  When the vertigo hits, we grab on and wait for it to pass.  I am speechless, really. 

love you and all who post here for all this help!  Amazing women, thank you all!

Insi
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