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pattypoo54

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Reply with quote  #1 
I have been reading some posts where people are prescribed vit D by there doctors? Is there a prescription for this or does it mean they are just recommending a dosage? My vit D level at this point is 37, just had it checked. How much should I be taking daily, my tablets are a 1000IU. Also which Posture D is the best I noticed online there are a couple different ones. Thanks for all you offer us on Gina's wonderful website, I feel safe here and know I will always get reliable information.
Thanks again,
Patty
edge

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Reply with quote  #2 

Patty:

 

Glad to help.

 

Now, Vitamin D as an oral supplement is OTC (over-the-counter) and hence does not require a doctor's prescription although a doctor can of course prescribe it, either for insurance coverage or the doctor may be ordering a high-potency prescription form, measured in micrograms (mcg) or milligrams (mg) instead of IU (international units), and finally a doctor can dispense in the office an injectable form of high-potency Vitamin D . 

 

As to best target level, this must be 42+ ng/ml (that is, at least 42 ng/ml) for optimal bone health, and 50+ ng/ml for optimal bone and antitumor benefit, and it typically takes between 3000 IUs - 4000 IUs daily to achieved that level.  However, the best way to determine the optimal level  is through a simple 25(OH)D (Vitamin D3) assay or laboratory test, also known as a cholecalciferol assay / test, but by most laboratories as the "25-Hydroxy Vitamin D" test or assay).   Since your level was 37, and we know that roughly each 1000 IUs of Vitamin D elevates serum 25(OH)D levels approximately 10 ng/ml above base, you would probably need an additional 2000 IUs added to the 1000 IU you are already taking, for a total of 3000 IUs daily, in order to top 50+ ng/ml.  But best that after you have taken the 3000 IU dose for approximately a couple of weeks, you be retested to assure that you are indeed 50+ ng/ml.

 

As to the Posture D, there are only two forms: a chewable form (blue box) from Iverness, and the standard form (orange box) from SmartCare, but aside from that, they are otherwise identical - they contain tricalcium phosphate, magnesium, and a small amount of Vitamin D3.  One of the cheaper sources is AmericaRX.com (click to go), but there are many others too.

 


Constantine Kaniklidis
Breast Cancer Watch
edge@evidencewatch.com

Calico

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Reply with quote  #3 
Constantine or anybody else,
how much weight does Vit D 2 have on blood tests and what is a normal range?
My D 3 was 67 (yayyyy) and D 2 was 4. I can't find a range for 2, is it important at all or only a tool to assess D 3?

Thank you so much

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edge

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Calico:

 

Understanding What the (25-hydroxy)Vitamin D Test Measures

The 25-(OH)D test, aka the 25-hydroxyvitamin D test, measures the blood calcidiol level, calcidiol being what's called a prehormone that is produced in the liver from the metabolism of vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol).  Vitamin D is metabolized in the liver to calcidiol (25-hydroxyvitamin D) and then in the kidney to 1, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D, the biologically functioning form of vitamin D (which we don't measure directly).  

 

Although the 25-OH)D test is often called the 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 test, it's important to note that the test is completely "blind" to D2 versus D3: it measures only a “total” calcidiol (the 25-hydroxyvitamin D) and does not distinguish how much is coming from exogenous (external) D2 and how much is biologically-identical D3 (whether from D3 supplementation or endogenous production).   But remember it is known that Vitamin D3 increases serum calcidiol (25-hydroxyvitamin D) far more efficiently than does vitamin D2.

 

So in your case, it's more correct to say that your calcidiol (25-hydroxyvitamin D) was 67, representing the total of D3 and D2 contributions, and since your D2 was 4, your D3 contribution was 63 towards the 67 calcidiol total (even though many labs continue to report total calcidiol from the test as if it were synonymous with total Vitamin D3, which it is not).  Optimality of Vitamin D for bone, anticancer and other health benefits is to have a calcidiol level measured out by the 25-hydroxyvitamin D test at 50+ ng/ml. It is rare (excluding erroneous supplementation with D2) for D2 to make a significant contribution to the calcidiol level, so it can essentially be ignored, and we don't bother with "ranging" it, as it is of minimal consequence.   An above 50 ng/ml is excellent, and its benefits accumulate with time on the Vitamin D3 supplementation. 

 


Constantine Kaniklidis
Breast Cancer Watch
edge@evidencewatch.com 

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Reply with quote  #5 
super,
thank you so much, again.
I was worried that the "low" number 4 would mean anything weird.
At least a check mark and less to worry about.
(I archive this with two doses included in citracal (4 pills of calcium) and 2 pills of D3 from NOW plus dietary intake).
You have an outstanding way to explain medical lingo!!!

How is your stem cell study going?

Much appreciation for everything you do to keep us calm!!!

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